JULIET BARKER AGINCOURT PDF

Editorial Reviews. Review. Juliet Barker tells this story beautifully. If you buy just one book of history this year, choose this one. It will make a wonderful. Editions. UK: Agincourt: The King, the Campaign, the Battle Little, Brown, ISBN: Abacus, ISBN: Audiobook. The Wars of the Roses by Alison Weir Agincourt by Juliet Barker The Plantagenets by Dan Jones Richard the Third by Paul Murray Kendall She- Wolves by.

Author: Maujinn Bak
Country: Chad
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Software
Published (Last): 19 April 2018
Pages: 97
PDF File Size: 19.4 Mb
ePub File Size: 15.48 Mb
ISBN: 211-6-28384-644-6
Downloads: 13698
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Tagore

Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England by Juliet Barker

Goodreads helps you keep track of aginxourt you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Return to Book Page. Preview — Agincourt by Juliet Barker. Waged almost six centuries ago, the Battle of Agincourt still captivates.

It is the classic underdog story, and generations have wondered how the English–outmanned by the French six to one–could have succeeded so bravely and brilliantly.

Drawing on a wide range of sources, Juliet Barker paints a gripping narrative of the October clash between the outnumbered English Waged almost six centuries ago, the Battle of Agincourt still captivates. Drawing on a wide range of sources, Juliet Barker paints a gripping narrative of the October clash between the outnumbered English archers and the heavily armored French knights.

Populated with chivalrous heroes, dastardly spies, and a ferocious and bold king, AGINCOURT is as earthshaking as its subject–and confirms Juliet Barker’s status as both a historian and a storyteller of the first rank. Paperbackpages. Published August 23rd by Back Bay Books first published Henry V of England. AgincourtFrance.

Juliet Barker – Wikipedia

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Agincourtplease sign up. Lists with This Book. I’ve given this very thorough, breathtaking book about the Battle of Agincourt 5 stars. I absolutely couldn’t put this one down. Juliet Barker covers all the events leading up to the battle, the battle itself and the aftermath so anything you want to know about Agincourt is probably included in this book. The author explains how Henry V raised the funds for his first campaign in France in great detail for anyone interested in Medieval finances.

She has meticulously scoured all the financial detail I’ve given this very thorough, breathtaking book about the Battle of Agincourt 5 stars.

She has meticulously scoured all the financial details if that particular subject interests you. Even if you decide to skim over some of this information you’ll still get a good idea how wars were financed in that era.

Barker researched many medieval records and documents and was able to glean from then a lot of things about the King’s personal and private life.

For example, the author brought to life the personal relationship aginvourt Henry V and his 1 year younger brother Thomas, Duke of Clarence. The author shows that there was clearly antipathy between these two. Thomas was their father’s favorite and was the alpha male, jock type that loved warfare. He had an outgoing personality and seemed to be the life of the party as well as rash and reckless. Apparently the Duke of Clarence and his father King Henry IV looked down upon older brother Agincuort intellectual pursuits with disdain with his father opining that Henry was only priest material.

Prince Henry was a seasoned warrior that helped his father defeat the Zgincourt clan’s uprising at the Battle of Shrewsbury. When it seemed that the King was going to lose the battle Aincourt V made a flank movement that destroyed Percy and his army – all at the age of Then the very busy Henry IV entrusted Prince Henry to put down the Welsh uprising even though his son was still in his teens.

Once again Prince Henry was able to put down the uprising and was very popular with his men. So as to why the Prince could never please his father is difficult to understand unless the invalid King resented and was jealous of his brilliant son. So apparently Henry V intellectual pursuits did not hinder him from being a great warrior. But still the King remained ever critical of Henry while his son Thomas was his pet.

  BAUDELAIRE FLANEUR PDF

I could almost imagine the sibling rivalry between the rough and tumble Thomas who no doubt felt he would make the better King than his more disciplined and well rounded older brother. Towards the end of King Henry IV reign his mysterious, juoiet malady was taking its toll on the King. Prince Henry was the de facto king at this point and lead the government council.

Unto the breach

Barksr Prince became the victim of spurious rumors and power struggles with his father taking him off his council and replacing him with his brother Thomas.

It does seem that Henry was to be demoted and no longer his father’s heir. The King’s council were divided over which faction to back in the French civil war after the assassination of Duke Louis d’Orleans the French king’s only brother by the rapacious Duke of Burgundy, his Uncle. The French King had periodic bouts of insanity so Duke Louis ran the government while helping himself to the French treasury. The Barkee of Burgundy was out of power and detested Duke Louis. The cowardly Burgundy had Louis assassinated in the streets of Paris during the dead of night and the French civil war began between the Burgundians and the Armagnac faction.

Duke Louis’s heir, Charles was about 16 years old when he came to power and he not only sought justice but revenge against Burgundy.

Unfortunately Charles was on his own since the insane king was not able to bring Burgundy to justice. So began the second half of the Hundred Years War as the Duke of Burgundy was determined to systematically destroy the late Duke’s family. As a side note; when the English Army had besieged the town of Orleans and were well on their way to conquering France, it seemed likely the Duke of Orleans would lose everything to Burgundy and England, with all jullet lost.

At this point they didn’t have anything to lose so she was well welcomed into the besieged town with the French army behind her which soundly lifted the siege and defeated the English. Orleans would be saved while Duke Charles was still a prisoner of war in England as he had been for 25 years after being captured at the Battle of Agincourt.

Prince Henry wanted to weaken France by siding with Burgundy; which would make his goal of recovering his stolen lands in France one step closer. Prince Thomas couldn’t wait to go to war – wanting to back the King of France’s faction the Armagnacs. The indulgent KIng sent Thomas to France to help the Armagnac cause while Prince Henry was kicked off the council and was once again in disfavor with his father.

Any plans that Thomas had of taking the crown from his brother were forever dashed and he was given little voice in the new government. Another hint that Henry V detested his brother Thomas became clearer after the King made his will upon embarking for war with France. He mentions his brother, John, Duke of Bedford as his ‘most favorite brother’ and his younger brother Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester as his beloved brother.

No mention of Thomas, Duke of Clarence. Henry the Vth’s superior intellect was much needed when it became time to raise troops and money for his desired war with France. Most English kings had outsourced sgincourt task to several different and high ranking nobleman but King Henry did everything himself, and did an barkef job to boot.

sgincourt As the author detailed all the planning necessary to wage war I had to marvel at the young King’s abilities. Henry V was a very complex man with many abilities and skills.

Not only was he a ruthless warrior, he was also a pious Christian and afincourt extremely intelligent man. All of these qualities combined made him one of England’s best loved Kings; and his amazing victory at Agincourt while outnumbered 5 to 1 is considered one of the greatest victories of all time.

Henry V would give all the glory to God. In this book Juliet Barker follows King Henry from the beginning to the end with his famous victory at Agincoury.

  CAMCOG TEST PDF

View all 43 comments. Going to war against France, whose king periodically believed himself to have aginvourt made of glass, may not have been exactly sporting but does show something of the character of Henry V of England would as Barker tells us in this book had been shot in the face by an arrow at the battle of Shrewsbury, the wound was packed out much as large wounds are today until it healed. Barker’s approach is to delight in the detail available to us from the Royal accounts.

We see the amounts of supplies and who Going to war against France, whose king periodically believed himself to have been made of glass, may not have been exactly sporting but does show something of the character of Henry V of England would as Barker tells us in this book had been shot in the face by an arrow at the battle of Shrewsbury, the wound was packed agincouet much as large wounds are today until it healed.

We see the amounts of supplies and who they came from such as the woman blacksmith involved in producing armaments, and also every man signed up for the campaign – at least in terms of numbers, because this was an army raised on contracts with leading figures undertaking to serve julift a fixed period of time with a certain number of combatants of a certain type such as armoured men at arms or archers.

As an accessible study of a single campaign this book is a fantastic achievement, it is not however going to give you a view of the larger issues of the Hundred Agkncourt war between England and France. Barker does continue her narrative from the aftermath of the battle down to the more or less final defeat of the English in the s in Conquest. View all 5 comments. Mar 19, Bill Rogers rated it it was amazing. History tells you what happened. Good history tells you why. Great history puts you in that world and makes you feel it, makes you start to understand it.

This is great history. Agincourt was too foreign a battle for me to understand. I had thought it was a rather pointless battle; a great English victory, certainly, but fought for no good reason in a cause that was ultimately futile. Barker’s book changed all that. It explained why, in the foreign culture that was England ofthe campaign w History tells you what happened. It explained why, in the foreign culture that was England ofthe campaign was necessary and logical.

It explained why, as the title states, the battle made England the nation and power it was from then forward through agincokrt. It also explained the behavior, rather bizarre to our eyes, of soldiers and nobles who still lived by what they considered the code of chivalry. This code was strong in England and even stronger in France. It barkwr perhaps no accident that there were many Lancelots, Gawains, Tristrams, and Arthurs among the casualties on the French side, and only one Tristram recorded killed on the English.

The ideal of Knightly Battle was stronger among the French, as reflected in their names, their bickering, and their casualty rolls. I was delighted by some of the little julliet of historical fact with which Barker sprinkled this book. The origin of aguncourt term “indenture,” as in “indentured servant,” in the physical form of the paper used to record such a contract.

The supposed origin of the British two-fingered version of that impolite gesture known to some in America, in its middle-finger only version, as the Hawaiian Good Luck Sign.

There were a number of such little tidbits, all enlightening and delightful. Highly recommended for fans of history. Sep 05, Jeanette rated it really liked it.

Author: admin