ABFRACCIONES DENTALES PDF

el 81% de los pacientes con edades comprendidas entre 45 a 59 años presentaban abfracciones, EDAD se asocia significativamente con las. DENTALES. abfraction la abfracción abrasive elabrasivo abrasion of teeth abscess abutment acid acidulated phosphate fluoride acrylic appliance active caries. Tooth wear or tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process and occurs throughout life but is considered pathological when the degree of.

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Abfraction is a theoretical concept explaining a loss of tooth structure not caused by tooth decay non-carious cervical lesions. It is suggested that these lesions are caused by forces placed on the teeth during biting, eating, chewing and grinding; the enamelespecially at the cementoenamel junction CEJundergoes large amounts of stress, causing micro fractures and tooth tissue loss.

Abfraction is a form of non-carious tooth denntales loss that occurs along the gingival margin. There is theoretical evidence to support the concept of abfraction, but little afracciones evidence exists. The term abfraction was first published in in a journal article dedicated to distinguishing the lesion.

The article was titled “Abfractions: This article was the first to establish abfraction as a new form of lesion, differing from abrasionattritionand erosion. Tooth tissue is gradually weakened causing tissue loss through abfraccioens and chipping or successively worn away leaving a non-carious lesion on the tooth surface.

These lesions occur in both the dentine and enamel of the tooth. These lesions generally occur around the cervical areas of abfraccionex dentition.

ABFRACCIONES: LESIONES CERVICALES NO CARIOSAS EN CUÑA, SU RE by Ana Maria De Stefani on Prezi

Abfraction lesions will generally occur in the region on the tooth where the greatest tensile stress is located. In statements such as these there is no dentqles on whether the lesions occur above or below the CEJ. One theory suggests that the abfraction lesions will only form above the CEJ. It is important to note that studies supporting this configuration of abfraction lesions also state that when there is more than one abnormally large tensile stress on a tooth two or more abfraction lesions can result on the one surface.

When looking at abfraction lesions there are generally three shapes in which they appear, appearing as either wedge, saucer or mixed patterns. Clinically, people with abfraction lesions can also present with tooth sensitivity in the associated areas.

As abfraction is still a controversial theory there are various ideas on what causes the lesions. Because of dnetales controversy the true causes of abfraction also remain disputable. Abfraccionws teeth come together in a non-ideal bite the researchers state that this would create further stress in areas on the teeth. Further research has shown that the normal occlusal dentalles from chewing and swallowing are not sufficient to cause the stress and flexion required to abfrcaciones abfraction lesions.

Yet further studies have shown that these lesions do not always appear in people with bruxism and others without bruxism have these lesions. There are other researchers who would state that occlusal forces have nothing to do with the lesions along the CEJ and that it is the result of abrasion from toothbrush with toothpaste that causes these lesions.

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Being theoretical in nature there is more than one idea on how abfraction presents clinically in the mouth. One theory of its clinical features suggests that the lesions only form above the cementoenamel drntales CEJ which is where the enamel and cementum meet on a tooth.

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Treatment of abfraction lesions can be difficult due to the many possible causes. To provide the best treatment option the dental clinician must determine the level of activity and predict possible progression of the lesion. Loss of a scratch mark signifies that the lesion is active and progressing. It is usually recommended when an abfraction lesion is less than 1 millimeter, monitoring at regular intervals is a sufficient treatment option.

If there are concerns around aesthetics or clinical consequences such as dentinal hypersensitivitya dental restoration white filling may be a suitable treatment option. Aside from restoring the lesion, it is equally important to remove any other possible causative factors. This can also be achieved by fentales the tooth surfaces such as cuspal inclines, reducing heavy contacts and removing premature contacts.

Abfraction has been a controversial subject since its creation in The major reasoning behind the controversy is the drntales of abfraction to other non carious lesions and the prevalence of multiple theories to potentially explain the lesion. One of the most prevalent theories is called “the theory of non-carious cervical lesions” which suggests that tooth flexion, occurring due to occlusion factors, abfraccioness on the vulnerable area near the cementoenamel junction. Many researchers argue that this is inaccurate as they contend that the abfraction lesion is a multifactorial has many causative factors lesion with other factors such as abrasion or erosion.

More research is needed to fully clear up the controversy surrounding the abfraction lesion. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Journal of Dental Research. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. A Review of the Literature. J Tenn Dent Assoc.

J Esthet Restor Dent. No Carious Cervical Lesions.

Oral and maxillofacial pathology K00—K06, K11—K14—, — Bednar’s aphthae Cleft palate High-arched palate Palatal cysts of the newborn Inflammatory papillary hyperplasia Stomatitis nicotina Torus palatinus. Oral mucosa — Lining of mouth. Squamous cell papilloma Keratoacanthoma Malignant: Adenosquamous carcinoma Basaloid squamous carcinoma Mucosal melanoma Spindle cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Verrucous carcinoma Oral florid papillomatosis Oral melanosis Smoker’s melanosis Pemphigoid Benign mucous membrane Pemphigus Plasmoacanthoma Stomatitis Aphthous Denture-related Herpetic Smokeless tobacco keratosis Submucous fibrosis Ulceration Riga—Fede disease Verruca vulgaris Verruciform xanthoma White sponge nevus.

Teeth pulpdentinenamel. Periodontium gingivaperiodontal ligamentcementumalveolus — Gums and tooth-supporting structures.

Cementicle Cementoblastoma Gigantiform Cementoma Eruption cyst Epulis Pyogenic granuloma Congenital epulis Gingival enlargement Gingival cyst of the adult Gingival abfraccions of the newborn Gingivitis Desquamative Granulomatous Plasma cell Hereditary gingival fibromatosis Hypercementosis Hypocementosis Linear gingival erythema Necrotizing periodontal diseases Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis Pericoronitis Peri-implantitis Periodontal abscess Periodontal trauma Periodontitis Aggressive As a manifestation of systemic disease Chronic Perio-endo lesion Teething.

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Periapical, mandibular and maxillary hard tissues — Bones of jaws. Nasopalatine duct Median mandibular Median palatal Traumatic bone Osteoma Osteomyelitis Osteonecrosis Abfracciiones Neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis Osteoradionecrosis Osteoporotic bone marrow defect Paget’s disease of bone Periapical abscess Phoenix abscess Periapical periodontitis Stafne defect Torus mandibularis.

Temporomandibular jointsmuscles of mastication and denrales — Jaw joints, chewing muscles and bite abnormalities. Benign lymphoepithelial lesion Ectopic salivary gland tissue Frey’s syndrome HIV salivary gland disease Necrotizing sialometaplasia Mucocele Ranula Pneumoparotitis Salivary duct stricture Salivary gland aplasia Salivary gland atresia Salivary gland diverticulum Salivary gland fistula Salivary gland hyperplasia Salivary gland hypoplasia Salivary gland neoplasms Abfraccinoes Basal cell adenoma Canalicular adenoma Ductal papilloma Monomorphic adenoma Myoepithelioma Oncocytoma Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum Pleomorphic adenoma Sebaceous adenoma Malignant: Orofacial soft tissues — Soft tissues around the mouth.

Acid erosion

Eagle syndrome Hemifacial hypertrophy Facial hemiatrophy Oral manifestations of systemic disease. Retrieved from ” https: Views Read Edit View history.

In other projects Wikimedia Commons. This page was last edited on 13 Julyat By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Palate Bednar’s aphthae Cleft palate High-arched palate Palatal cysts of the newborn Inflammatory papillary hyperplasia Stomatitis nicotina Torus palatinus. Periodontium gingivaperiodontal ligamentcementumalveolus — Gums and tooth-supporting structures Cementicle Cementoblastoma Gigantiform Cementoma Eruption cyst Epulis Pyogenic granuloma Congenital epulis Gingival enlargement Gingival cyst of the adult Gingival cyst of the newborn Gingivitis Desquamative Granulomatous Plasma cell Hereditary gingival fibromatosis Hypercementosis Hypocementosis Linear gingival erythema Necrotizing periodontal diseases Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis Pericoronitis Peri-implantitis Periodontal abscess Periodontal trauma Periodontitis Aggressive As a manifestation of systemic disease Chronic Perio-endo lesion Teething.

Periapical, mandibular and maxillary hard tissues — Bones of jaws Agnathia Alveolar osteitis Buccal exostosis Cherubism Idiopathic osteosclerosis Mandibular fracture Microgenia Micrognathia Intraosseous cysts Odontogenic: Temporomandibular jointsmuscles of mastication and malocclusions — Jaw joints, chewing muscles and bite abnormalities Bruxism Condylar resorption Mandibular dislocation Malocclusion Crossbite Open bite Overbite Overeruption Overjet Prognathia Retrognathia Scissor bite Maxillary hypoplasia Temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

Salivary glands Benign lymphoepithelial lesion Ectopic salivary gland tissue Frey’s syndrome HIV salivary gland disease Necrotizing sialometaplasia Mucocele Ranula Pneumoparotitis Salivary duct stricture Salivary gland aplasia Salivary gland atresia Salivary gland diverticulum Salivary gland fistula Salivary gland hyperplasia Salivary gland hypoplasia Salivary gland neoplasms Benign: Orofacial soft tissues — Soft tissues around the mouth Actinomycosis Angioedema Basal cell carcinoma Cutaneous sinus of dental origin Cystic hygroma Gnathophyma Ludwig’s angina Macrostomia Melkersson—Rosenthal syndrome Microstomia Noma Oral Crohn’s disease Orofacial granulomatosis Perioral dermatitis Pyostomatitis vegetans.

Other Eagle syndrome Hemifacial hypertrophy Facial hemiatrophy Oral manifestations of systemic disease.

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